The Most Beautiful Birds of Western North Carolina

birds of Western North CarolinaChoosing to visit an amazing place like Western North Carolina, you will be able to see and experience a lot of great things. Our area is known for having lots of fun outdoor activities that are available for most of the year. People from all around love hitting our trails for anything from an easy stroll to a challenging hike. Western North Carolina also has a lot of different places and trails to explore as well and we at Orchard Inn have explored most of them. One great way to enjoy the area is to check out all of the different birds of Western North Carolina. Our trails and mountains are home to a lot of different species of birds of Western North Carolina. Here are some of the types of birds you can find and different places to see them.

Species of Birds of Western North Carolina

Just like life, looking at the birds of Western North Carolina all have seasons. Some enjoy colder weather and some enjoy warmer weather. Also, since the elevations of the habitats of the birds of Western North Carolina can change so quickly, it’s safe to say that you will be able to enjoy many types of birds in a small place. Here is a quick list of some of the types of birds of Western North Carolina that are found.

Throughout the year, you can find:

Great Blue Heron

Wild Turkey

Rocking Dove

Cooper’s Hawk

Blue Jay

Carolina Wren

American Robin

Eastern Screech-Owl

Downy Woodpecker

Mallard

Tufted Titmouse

The birds of Western North Carolina that you will find in our warmer months are:

Chimney Swift

Barn Swallow

Yellow Warbler

Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Baltimore Oriole

Red-winged Blackbird

Wood Thrush

Gray Catbird

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Lastly, these are the birds of Western North Carolina that enjoy our colder weather:

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Purple Finch

Pine Siskin

Evening Grosbeak

Dark-eyed Junco

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker

Best Places to See the Birds of Western North Carolina

As you can see there are many different types of birds of Western North Carolina that you can enjoy while you visit here. However, you may not know the best places to find these amazing creatures. While you can see birds anywhere, there are some key places to go to go birding. The first place to enjoy the birds of Western North Carolina is Chimney Rock State Park. While this park has a lot to offer any visitor, it is a great spot for birding. The trails criss cross all over the park and will allow you to explore many different species. This 1,000 acre park is best for birding in the spring, especially April and May. The best trail to take for looking at birds of Western North Carolina is Hickory Nut Falls trail. On this trail it isn’t uncommon to see birds close to the trail as well as nesting in the trails that line it.

Another great place to check out the birds of Western North Carolina, as well as have a challenge, is to hike Grandfather Mountain. Located above Asheville in Linville, this area is home to one of the tallest peaks in the Blue Ridge as well as some interesting species of birds. Since the elevation is so dramatic from the base to the peak, many endangered species of birds are found in this area. There are a few different trails that you can take to discover the birds however, the best birding trail is Profile Trail. This is where you will go up 1,500 feet in just 3 shore miles which will give you the biggest birding for your time.

We at Orchard Inn love helping our guests plan an amazing trip to our area, especially to see our birds of Western North Carolina. We encourage guests who like to go birding to stay with us at Orchard Inn because of the views of the mountains from not only the rooms but the fact that many of our guests enjoy glimpses of birds from our dining room as well. Some of the types of birds of Western North Carolina that we see on a regular basis are cardinals and gold finches. Consider staying with us on your next birding adventure to Western North Carolina and let us help you find some of the best places to experience our birds of Western North Carolina.

Photo by: Dawn Huczek